Local & Regional Councils: Governance Assessment 2022

The Local and Regional Government Annual Assessment is a new IPPR publication which is planned to appear in the last quarter of each calendar year. Assessments are based on the levels of transparency and accountability exhibited by each of Namibia’s 14 regional councils along with a geographically representative subset of 18 of the country’s 57 […]

After Fishrot: Urgent Need For Transparency & Accountability

In the three years since the news of the Fishrot corruption scandal made global headlines, nothing has been done to reform the highly secretive way in which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources operates. This briefing paper calls for a complete opening up of the fisheries sector and urges the Ministry to publish full […]

The Potential For Open Contracting In Namibia

Publishing the contracts and licences that government signs with mining, oil and gas companies is now on the radar in Namibia – after government committed to introducing international best practices on transparency and accountability by 2025.

Open Budget Survey – Launch of Namibian Results

Transparency, participation, and accountability in the budget process lead to lower corruption, more revenue, and better government services. Join us for the launch of the Open Budget Survey results for Namibia on Wednesday 1 June 2022. RSVP – info@ippr.org.na

MPs’ Assets Register Remains A Concern

National Assembly MPs are supposed to submit their assets and interests declarations every year but the system is in disarray with widespread non-compliance and lax enforcement of the rules. Our latest Perspectives on Parliament bulletin looks at situation as another deadline for MPs to submit their details is about to pass.

Keep Your Eyes On The Money

A summary of the main findings and recommendations of the IPPR research report, Keep Your Eyes On The Money: Public Fiscal Management & Oversight in Namibia – The Need for Public Participation & Reform

The Auditor-General’s Role in Tackling Corruption

This new briefing paper argues that the Office of the Auditor-General should take a more pro-active approach to tackling corruption and find ways of collaborating with key stakeholders including the Anti-Corruption Commission and civil society.